This blog is moving!
At last I have discovered a way to have my website and blog all in one place.
So from now on all new blog posts will be on my new website.
I'm still writing about the same sort of things, and you can still find the old posts on this page.

Thursday, 6 April 2017

How to Commission a Piece of Art Online

It can be a scary thing asking someone to create a piece of art for you, especially if you're going on line to do it. Usually the art you want to commission is of something or someone very dear to you so you want it to be just right.
I've painted quite a few commissioned works in my time often of peoples families and pets and as an artist I feel a huge responsibility to translate my clients vision into a painting that will hang on their wall for years and be regarded with affection.
© Mary Kemp
This is a painting of two of my grandchildren, which I painted after a trip to the seaside.  It has been the jumping off point for several commissions of family beach portraits.

To reach this happy state of affairs it's incumbent on both artist and client to work together.
So this is why I thought I would write a guide about how to commission a painting online:
  • Do your research, spend hours if necessary trawling the internet to find an artist whose style you absolutely love, and who will paint you the perfect picture in their style.
  • From what you have seen is this someone who makes it easy for you to work with them? Have they got good reviews on their website and other outlets? Is it someone you can trust?
  • Get in touch as soon as possible. These things take time.
  • Be clear in your mind what you want and discuss this in detail with the artist. This is the time to refine your ideas. Also be clear about the amount of money you want to spend.
  • If it's not working at this stage pull out. Seriously. A transaction like this should work smoothly.
  • If your artist is to use your photographs now you're all set to send as many photos of good quality of your subject as you possibly can. They'll want to know if they can work from them.
  • Agree materials and size. Do you want your painting framed?
  • MOST IMPORTANTLY AGREE PRICE AND TIME FRAME. Most artists will ask for a non returnable deposit at this stage. Some artists will also  provide a written contract and if you want one and it's not been offered ask for it.
  • This is the time to ask for a rough sketch of the painting you have agreed upon. Changes can be easily made at this stage, much more difficult once the painting is underway. 
  • When you are totally happy with the design, and are sure that is how you want your painting to look, then give the go ahead. After that sit back and let your artist work their magic. At this point things are out of your hands!
  • The day has arrived. You've received an email with an image of your painting. Excitement all round. If you've followed these guidelines there's a good chance your expectations have been met. If not, communicate. Most things can be resolved. We artists want  happy customers.
  • When you know it's right pay the balance and await your parcel.

    © Mary Kemp
  •   And when  you've received  your painting if  you could let  the artist know  that would be  most welcome,  and a photo in  situ brings joy to  the heart!
 

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